Program

The program is also available as an epub. (updated 29/04)

Talks will take place in room 1050 of the Earth Sciences building (5 Bancroft Ave), while other sessions are in rooms 315, 316 and 323 of the Bancroft Building (4 Bancroft Ave).

Wednesday 29 April 2015

15:20

Welcome + State of the Libre Graphics

We will kick off LGM2015 with a joint session that sums up all things that have happened in our wide landscape over the last year.

16:00

Kelvin Ma

Creating textbook-grade SVG illustrations for Wikipedia

Hi! I am an SVG artist who produces CC vector illustrations to illustrate Wikipedia articles. Other wikimedians who have gone to LGM in the past have suggested that I give a talk at LGM about my work, since this is a rather new thing for Wikipedia and other Wikimedia projects, as these projects have typically been stronger in text and photography. My illustrations have received dozens of awards from Wikimedia Commons, and I would like to give a talk about producing and contributing them. My Commons SVG portfolio can be found at https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Kelvinsong/Portfolio.
I believe that this would be a valuable talk, because SVG is typically associated with HTML drawing and low-level technical diagrams, and there are few examples of the format being used for anything more sophisticated than graphs, schematics, and simple drawings, or more meaningful than proof-of-concept artistic renditions of cars or anime figures. I would like to tell people how SVG can be used to provide high quality textbook-level illustrations, and get more SVG artists involved in illustrating Wikipedia.

I am an American vector artist and type designer, who works exclusively in Inkscape, Blender, Fontforge etc and other free/open source apps. I have been contributing SVG illustrations to the wikimedia project for about two years, and at the time of writing, 31 of my images have made Commons Featured Picture status. One of the images I was also paid to write a tutorial for on VectorTuts (http://design.tutsplus.com/tutorials/use-blender-and-inkscape-to-create-a-titans-atmosphere-infographic--vector-22221). I also do a lot of type design, and I used to do a lot of 3D art and animation in Blender.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Kelvinsong/Portfolio

16:20

Matt Lee

The List powered by Creative Commons

No one can be everywhere at once. But everyone can.

NGOs, journalists, government agencies, and cultural institutions all need photographs to tell their story and educate others. But there’s no way for those organizations to be in the right place at the right time, every time. That’s where we come in.

Through The List, organizations will provide lists of locations, people, and events that they need photographs of. And when users are in the right place at the right time, they can claim an item from the list and publish a photograph of it.

All photos on The List (CC-BY) are freely licensed, meaning that everyone can use them.

Matt Lee is the technical lead at Creative Commons. He previously ran campaigns at the Free Software Foundation.

He is the founder of Libre.fm and the GNU social network, and is currently directing the feature comedy movie, Orang-U. The movie will be released under CC-BY-SA along with all of the source materials for the movie.

http://creativecommons.org/

16:40–
17:00

Jon Nordby

imgflo: On-demand serverside image processing

imgflo is a image processing server with a HTTP API,
using GEGL and node.js. Images are processed on-demand
by accessing an URL which specifies the input image,
operations to perform and associated parameters.

imgflo uses the Flowhub visual programming IDE to allow
image processing pipelines to be developed using
a visual, interactive, node-based editor.
The pipelines can then be deployed to the server,
or one can use them in other GEGL-based applications
- including GIMP.

The talk will cover motivation for an image processing server,
possible uses, and demo current capabilities.

The imgflo project was started after discussions at LGM2014,
and is used in production since October at thegrid.io

Jon is a software engineer at The Grid, responsible for the
image processing capabilities of their AI web publishing tool.
Since 2010 he has worked on several libre graphics projects,
including MyPaint, OpenRaster and GEGL.
In his spare time, Jon currently researches digital fabrication technologies
at the Bitraf hackerspace in Oslo.

http://imgflo.org

Break

17:20

Pathum Egodawatta

Jumping

This presentation will review Sri Lankan graphic design as a Case Study for the role of Libre Graphics tools and practices in the developing world. I work with a group of friends as a design studio / collective (mooniak.com) and we started using libre tools, mainly Inkscape / FontForge for our design work around a year back. I will use some of the projects we do at mooniak.com to demonstrate my points. Over the last year we managed to work with clients to do their design projects and then publish the content under CC licenses. Each distinctive culture needs stock images, icons and fonts relevant to that culture. A proprietary model has not provided those design assets to the small market in Sri Lanka. Convincing clients to make projects libre is not easy. We have a simple model, clients get a discount if they wish to go libre. We can give a better price, because we don’t have the overheads (We work from home) software costs, and because we use open content.The other aspect I will focus is challenges that we faced in migrating as a group, coming from different backgrounds. And wrap up with few thoughts on why developing world is a better playground for Libre Graphics Tools.

Pathum Egodawatta is a Graphic Designer based in Colombo, Sri Lanka, who graduated from the Academy of Design, Colombo with a 1st Class BA Graphic Design degree in 2013, topping the batch. He currently works with a bunch of like minded designers at mooniak, a collaborative creative practice focused on visual design, type design and design centric social enterprises. Mooniak appreciates free culture and sharing and releases almost all its work under free culture licenses.

http://mooniak.com

17:40

peter sikking

Metapolator: designing interaction for creative pros

As a result of the 2014 LGM the Metapolator project got really going and I got involved, designing all its interaction. This talk shows how the interaction design was structured, the collaboration, research involving font designers, and what goes into designing for creatives.

Peter Sikking is very well known in Libre Graphics circles for his work on GIMP and his presentations at previous LGMs. An interaction designer for more than 20 years, he is specialised in designing interaction for creative pros.

http://blog.mmiworks.net

18:00

Myriam Cea

Why are black plums red when they are green?

Ten years later, the Libre Graphics ecosystem has become a galaxy made of a large number of projects that nourish it. This Galaxy develops because we help each other to grow. Going beyond with Libre Graphics involves sharing our practices with people who are not designers, programmers, artists or developers - with those who have not yet taken off.

In February 2015, Gráfica Liebre is launching an open women’s group called The Plums which will meet on a weekly basis. A space for thinking, learning and producing with Libre Tools and open practices in a feminist atmosphere. The aim is to share our knowledge regarding visual language with women who are interested, in order to broaden their capacity to read and produce, while promoting the Libre Graphics outlook amongst the
female population. Working as a group and learning through practice, participants will become lucid and active visual readers and producers.

Given the time frame, this talk doesn’t present achievements, but rather aims to share the project in its initial stages and seeks to obtain valuable feedback from the Toronto meeting that can contribute to the successful development of this experience.

Myriam Cea (Madrid, Spain, 1975). I've always been interested in Arts and creativity; it's for that that I studied Sculpture (Escuela de Artes y Oficios La Palma, Madrid. 1997-2000), Engraving (Escola superior de disseny i art Llotja. Barcelona. 1995-2000), and finally Graphic Design (Escuela Superior de Diseño, Madrid. 2009-2013).
Among other professional activities related to design and its promotion, I'd been in charge of the Libre Graphics WorkStation in Medialab-Prado Madrid the last two years. At the same time I concived the idea of forming a working group on open source tools and practices. Today this group has become in an Association for Open Design and a graphic design studio, the first one that works exclusively whit libre tools in Madrid. We called it Gráfica Liebre, curretly leaded by Beatriz F. Estévez and myself.

http://www.graficaliebre.com

18:20–
18:40

Antonio Roberts

Allowing Mistakes to Happen

Glitch art is the aestheticisation of digital or analogue errors, such as artefacts and other ''bugs'', by either corrupting digital code/data, misusing software, or by physically manipulating electronic devices. In cases where software is misused to create glitch art artists will work with software that allow mistakes and misuse to happen, for example, by importing image data into the Audacity audio editor.

GIMP, Inkscape Scribus and their proprietary counterparts are promoted as facilitating creativity. However, these programs and many others often return errors when dealing with the corrupted data made through the glitching process. Should the software be doing this? Does refusing to attempt to interpret this data limit the creative output of these artists?

In this presentation I will present my own work and experiences of creating art through errors. I will share commonly used techniques and discuss the relevance of glitch art in the wider design and art world. My intention is to present the case to developers to allow mistakes to happen and to artists to incorporate errors into their work.

Antonio Roberts is a new-media artist and curator based in Birmingham, UK. Since 2007 he has curated exhibitions and projects including fizzPOP (2009 - 2010), GLI.TC/H Birmingham (2011), the Birmingham editions of Bring Your Own Beamer (2012, 2013) and Dirty New Media (2013).

As a performer and visual artist his work has been featured at galleries and festivals including Databit.me in Arles, France, Laptops Meet Musicians Festival in Venice, Italy, f(Glitch) at Stony Brook University, NY, glitChicago at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern art in Chicago, IL, Loud Tate: Code at Tate Britain, UK, and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts in Birmingham, UK.

He is artist in residence at the University of Birmingham where he is conducting research into copyright and the reuse and remixing of archive material.

http://www.hellocatfood.com

Thursday 30 April 2015

Amelia Bellamy-Royds

Accessible Graphics on the Web

Are your graphics accessible to all audiences? This presentation introduces key concepts and methods behind accessibility. It focuses on SVG on the web, but many ideas have broader applications, to the graphics you create and the tools you create them with.

The talk will address the following questions:
- What does it mean for content to be accessible? Using the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) standards, we ask: is it perceivable, operable, understandable, and robust?
- How can graphics be accessible? It depends on their purpose: What information should they communicate? How should they be interactive?
- How does SVG support accessibility? It features structured content, readable text, interactive links, and alternative text.
- How can accessible graphics be improved? Web accessibility tools now support advanced interaction and document navigation using ARIA (Accessible Rich Internet Applications) attributes, but ARIA 1 did not emphasize graphics.
- What is being done now? The W3C's SVG Accessibility Task Force is helping integrate ARIA and SVG, and providing guidance on best practices.
- How will this impact non-SVG graphics? Annotated markup can be used in hidden fallback content for HTML Canvas graphics, and could be integrated in other XML-based vector graphics and charts.

Amelia Bellamy-Royds is an invited expert member of the W3C's SVG Working Group, active in the SVG Accessibility Task Force. She is the co-author of SVG Essentials, 2nd Edition (with J. David Eisenberg) and the forthcoming Using SVG with CSS3 and HTML5 (with Kurt Cagle).

More broadly, Amelia is a freelance writer specializing in scientific and technical communication, with a particular interest in data visualization. She has a B.Sc. in Bioinformatics, a Master's in Journalism, and an unending desire to discover new things. Online, you can find her as AmeliaBR on Codepen, Stack Exchange, Github, or Web Platform Docs. Offline, she lives in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.

10:20

Carl Chouinard

Designing websites using constraints with GSS

GSS reimagines CSS layout & replaces the browser’s layout engine with one that harnesses the Cassowary Constraint Solver — the same algorithm Apple uses to compute native layout.

This presentation will demonstrate what can be done using GSS and how thinking layouts in terms of constraints is a very natural way of creating layouts. With constraints you can focus on the what rather than the how.

Software engineer for more than 10 years, I'm involved with TheGrid creating the first artificial intelligence capable of creating and designing websites. I'm actively contributing to the GSS open source project which is used for layout designs of TheGrid' websites.

http://gridstylesheets.org/

10:40

Eric Schrijver

Creating realtime collaborative web applications with Derby.js and Meteor.js

The technologies needed to create realtime collaborative web applications have recently become much more accessible to web developers. Realtime web applications allow users to modify values without having to submit forms and/or reload the page, and any changes made by one user are propagated to other users—without them needing to reload the page either. While the software industry’s uptake of such techniques has been largely driven by the popularity of social network type applications, the mechanims work very well to create collaborative creative applications.

Two popular frameworks, Meteor.js and Derby.js, provide solutions for the synchronisation and data binding required to make such applications function. Eric will introduce these two frameworks and their respective strength and show how they are used within OSP. Eric details the creation of Ethertoff.js (with Derby.js) and demos the creation of a collaborative font drawing tool (with Meteor.js).

OSP makes graphic design using only free and open source software. A caravan of practitioners from diverse fields, they design, program, research and teach. Working for print and web and its hybrids, OSP creates visual identities and digital utilities, always digging for a more intimate relation with the tool.

Eric Schrijver designs and develops with OSP. He also teaches at the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague and is the editor in chief of the group blog ‘I like tight pants and mathematics’

http://osp.kitchen/ http://i.liketightpants.net/and/

11:00–
11:20

Chris Murphy

The State of Color Management

State of affairs in managing color: What's new, what's working, and what could be better, and things to look forward to.

Chris Murphy is president of Color Remedies™ based in Denver. He specializes in worldwide training and consulting in emerging color technologies and has extensive experience in implementing color management workflows. He has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts in the City of New York, and is co-author of “Real World Color Management” published by Peachpit Press. Some say he has extra-sensory vision, but he continues to assure everyone that he does not.

Break

11:40

Jan-Christoph Borchardt

Pushing open source UX design – how we do it in ownCloud

In this talk I will present the methods to improve open source design that we use at ownCloud as well as what I learned from other projects.

Some topics I will cover:
* how to establish a design culture in your project
* how to work together with developers
* making designers develop and developers design
* getting university students involved
* the importance of cross-project collaboration

Jan-Christoph Borchardt is an open source designer, currently focused on ownCloud. He worked with several open source software projects including Unhosted, Terms of Service; Didn’t Read, Litewrite, Shotwell (Ubuntu's photo app), Diaspora and more. Jan regularly collaborates with design universities to get students involved in open source, and tries to connect the open source design community.

http://jancborchardt.net

12:00

Alexandre Gauthier-Foichat

Natron: compositing with Blender integration

This year at LGM we want to present where the Natron open-source software is headed and what it can do. The presentation will consist mainly of a demonstration of the new advanced features of Natron. We will show how to use Blender render layers in Natron to produce powerful and efficient effects. We will also emphasise groups in Natron and how they can be created to improve your workflow.

The presentation will be prepared by the core-team of Natron.

Alexandre Gauthier-Foichat is lead developer of the Natron project. He began thinking the architecture of the software in june 2012 while finishing up his studies at the university. Shortly after, joined by scientist Frédéric Devernay, the team ambitioned to bring to the compositing industry the open-source mind so that is practise may be more wide-spread.

http://natron.inria.fr

12:20

Stéphanie Vilayphiou, Eric Schrijver

html2print

In the last year, Brussels-based design collective Open Source Publishing has used HTML to create printed publications. Some of them were only published in print, while others were hybrid publications appearing both in print and on-line or as slideshows. Some of these publications were built from scratch and others used the experimental CMS Ethertoff. In all cases a number of tools were needed to facilitate the transition from the screen to the printed page.

In this talk OSP will showcase a number of projects: the visual identity for the Brussels Balsamine theatre, the hybrid publication ‘Are you being Served’ that serves to document both online and in print the epynomous conference, and the art and theory periodical f-u-t-u-r-e.org. The presentation highlights the challenges which are posed when adapting screen technologies to the printed medium. OSP also profits from the occasion to introduce a series of tools called HTML2print which facilitate this process!

Stéphanie Vilayphiou is a young artist and designer investigating how software (transparently developed) can deeply question the fixity of the printed page and the whole defensive copyright practices historically consolidated. (From: http://espacevirtuel.jeudepaume.org/la-carte-ou-le-territoire-1834/)

http://osp.kitchen

12:40

Shankari Priyadarshini Ravichandran

Libre fonts for Tamil

Globalization has led to the need for multi-script and multi-lingual typography with demands for wide script coverage, comprehensive type-families that allow typographic differentiation in scripts that have not developed a tradition for this. The type and typography of some cultures and scripts have been more invested in than others, causing a gap in typographic standards. One such interesting gap are the features of a typeface family or system of typefaces that allow typographic differentiation. Complicating the issue further is the fact that some scripts have not developed a tradition to support this kind of differentiation. In display contexts there is also a demand for highly expressive vernacular type with a range of qualities and feelings found in the vast number of type styles available for the Latin script. These are the serious challenges for a script like Tamil. At a micro design level the contrasting angular and circular forms with a lot of counter spaces are a challenge to harmonize. At the macro level, there is regional user preference for slanted type in body text or text for extended reading in India, and a diaspora community which may prefer an upright or un-slanted style. This talk will delve into these issues and speculate what steps are required for the moment.

Pria is interested in the problem solving aspect of design. Being a native of Chennai, India, the typographic standards of Tamil led her to pursue an MA in Typeface Design at the University of Reading. She consults for URW++, Monotype & Google. Libre fonts are a natural extension of her interests in Indic Type-Design, as it is an effective platform that aids the transition of scripts into the digital future.

13:00

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 13:00-15:20

13:20

Jan-Christoph Borchardt

UX review of each other’s projects

Let’s get together and do some usability testing and review of each other’s projects! Be it websites, apps or mockups, we should look at what everyone’s doing and how to improve it.

Jan-Christoph Borchardt is an open source designer, currently focused on ownCloud. He worked with several open source software projects including Unhosted, Terms of Service; Didn’t Read, Litewrite, Shotwell (Ubuntu's photo app), Diaspora and more. Jan regularly collaborates with design universities to get students involved in open source, and tries to connect the open source design community.

http://jancborchardt.net

Christina Kral, Simon Worthington

Marshall McLuhan Archive - Archive Sprint

The Hybrid Publishing Consortium (HPC) is an Open Source publishing infrastructure research group and proposes a session on ‘Publishing from Archives’ based on the Marshall McLuhan fonds in Library & Archives Canada, in Ottawa. The archive contains video, audio, manuscripts and experimental transmedia work of Marshall McLuhan himself.
We use an Open Source tool chain of; Pando.ra (video archives), Tamboti - Heidelberg Research Architecture (collection management. Cluster Asia Europe, Heidelberg University) and famo.us (3D, GUI interface), Amara (video sub-titling. Participatory Culture Foundation) and Transpect (multi-format publishing. le-tex, Leipzig).
With this tool set we allow users to author a data enrichment layer on-top of the existing collection data, allowing the public to become archivists and share their knowledge and insights. We use the model of the Book Sprints, but instead use transmedia content (video, audio, text, annotation etc) to create a trace on the archive or a new publication.
This ‘Archive Sprint’ user layer on the archive creating a rich visual and auditory interface, secondly it leaves a new data source on the archive which is VRA, MODS meta description US Library of Congress compliant.
The objective is to allow users to move from a light experience of creating ‘playlists’, to authoring on the involved level of Wikipedia. At the same time ensuring the data structure created is machine readable and so re-usable for—visual styling, citation, annotation, distribution and metrics etc.
This project remixes a lecture given by Graham Larkin in 2011 in Berlin.


Christina Kral: As part of a transdisciplinary research team, Kral explores the future of publishing in relation to open educational technologies. In particular, Kral researches forms of communication and engagement, learning habits and routines and develops transitional platforms and encounters that push publishing beyond normal conventions. In her capacity as an artist, she explores practical utopias in form of experimental facilitation and publishing projects. She is co-creator of an educational reality game (YKON Game). She is co-founder of Betta Zine, an artistic research publication project that draws from first hand experiences with the goal to open multiple perspectives/entry points to seemingly contradictory combinations such as shopping & war, education & war. She has been awarded artist residencies & stipends at Eyebeam, Art and Technology Center in New York, the EdLab Digital Arts Residency at Columbia University, New York, the Interdisciplinary Residency in Art and Ecology in Guapamacátaro, Mexico and at SPACE in London, UK.

Simon Worthington: works on open source software infrastructures for independent publishing—realtime, transcluded, transmedia, scaleable and cloud-based. In 1994 he co-founded Mute magazine. In 2012 he founded the Hybrid Publishing Consortium as a technology research organisation to support publisher innovation and book liberation. simon@metamute.org

http://www.consortium.io/mcluhan-media-sprint-recap-outlook

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 13:00-15:20

15:20

Break

15:40

Lightning talks

Four 10 minute slots for lightning talks. Sign-up on location!

16:00

Hong Phuc Dang

Towards Open Textile and Garment Production

What is the progress of developing FLOSS tools, software and hardware for a fair and environment friendly garment and textile production? The talk will introduce our work and projects that help us to break down the locks that exists on every level in the industry from design, to software, machines and distribution.

Hong Phuc Dang is mainly known as the founder and organizer of FOSSASIA. She has lived several years in the US and Singapore after her childhood in Vietnam. Apart from the fascination in mathematics and technology she is interested in how technology can improve peoples live. As a member of the FashionTec working group she works on topics of mathematical grading of garment patterns. She also coordinates the Google Summer of Code program of FOSSASIA.

http://blog.fossasia.org

16:20

Louis Desjardins

Text interaction - how far and how better can it get?

Text interaction is a challenge to any graphic production. Editorial team and graphic design teams must interact all the way from the first step of handing out the text from one to the other, until the final product is achieved. This is not a one-way ride. In fact, the workflow doesn’t flow downstream all the way. There are many stops along the way, and going back and forth is part of the job. How this is done? How can this be improved? What’s the missing link?

Co-founder of Mardigrafe, a Montreal-based graphic design and print shop since 1986, Louis Desjardins is contributing to the Scribus projet since 2004. He’s a passionate typographer and graphic art specialist as well as a lively presenter. Louis is participating to LGM since the first one in Lyon in 2006.

http://www.mardigrafe.com

16:40

Loraine Furter

SPECIMEN – designing fonts (hi)story(ies)

At last LGM I did a lightning talk to present SPECIMEN, a blog and growing collection of graphic essays on F/LOS typefaces. This project was developed to rethink the traditional “neutral” form of font specimens, instead choosing a specific layout and content in line with the history and cultural implications of each typeface. An approach that takes in consideration the sources and the documentation of the fonts.

This year I would like to propose both a lecture with examples of this approach to F/LOS typefaces and a “specimen workshop” (see workshop proposal).

This year, I would like to go further into the ideas developed in this project and show examples of F/LOS specimens (made by others and made by me) taking in consideration the fonts’ (hi)story. The lecture has three aims: to provide reflection on what constitutes an appropriate specimen for a libre typeface, to invite font designers to share more information on the font’s history(ies), and to prepare the ground for the connected workshop, or “specimen sprint” held during LGM.

Loraine Furter is a graphic designer who recently met the Open Source approach, enriching her (graphical) practice and vision of creation. Loraine is active in the research around new forms of publishing, from digital and hybrid publishing to book sprints, and frequently gives workshops on this subject.

http://specimen.meteor.com/

17:00

Colm O'Neill, Ludi Loiseau, Gijs de Heij, Pierre Huyghebaert

Stroke fonts

With the invention of movable-type in 1450, writing became type-setting. Where a letters' shape used to be the result of the movement of hand and pen it became a meticoulously designed outline ready to be copied millions of times in mass-production. Writing turned into typograhy. Instead of transferring the skeleton: the gesture. We transfer it's facade. And so, for more than five centuries, typography has been kept away from the potential of writing.
In the progression of typography from punch cutting through to font design software we've ported over old physical constraints to digital canvases, canvasses that are really much more flexible than what we are currently using them as. Partly because of the typographer himself, feeling the custodian of a very long tradition, the constraints and economics of production but also for the convenience of the major software publishers already struggling in trying to manage and cover all of the world's writing systems. OSP continues to emphasize this issue and would like to present the work, experiments and paths we've explored around this issue by showing (stroke-)fonts we've drawn but more importantly the tools we have and are developing to reclaim the potential in typography.

OSP makes graphic design using only free and open source software. A caravan of practitioners from diverse fields, they design, program, research and teach. Working for print and web and its hybrids, OSP creates visual identities and digital utilities, always digging for a more intimate relation with the tool.

http://osp.kitchen

17:20

Nathan Willis

Thrilling Developments From the Field of Boring Font Utilities

This session has two halves. First, I will present my work on two personal font-development tools: one is a command-line utility for automatically building installable release packages (in RPM, Deb, CTAN, and Zip format) of font families, and the other is a set of Emacs Major Modes for editing font files with syntax highlighting, auto-indent, and tokenization. The packaging tool adresses an area often overlooked in open font development: rolling a release. The Emacs modes make it easier to edit and debug font source files. Hopefully both tools will help make some well-tested methods from software development more useful in type design.

Second, I'll discuss the recent effort announced on CREATE to develop and implement GUI UX patterns for accessing OpenType features, and why it's important to free software. OpenType substitution and positioning features are one of the format's major selling points to type designers, but they have poor support in creative applications. The proprietary software industry has let this slide as a business decision; free software can deliver what users want to see.

Nathan Willis is a free-software journalist and open font designer.

http://glyphography.com

17:40

Dave Crossland

Goodbye FontForge

FontForge has been the leading libre font editor for more than 10 years now. Three years ago I began Crafting Type, a collective and co-operative project to offer short type design introduction workshops around the world, using only libre graphics tools. Around that time the FontForge founder, George Williams, stepped away from the project to pursue other hobbies, so I stepped up to organise the development that I found Crafting Type participants asking for. Despite fixing many crashes and bugs and attempts to add brave new features, last year I became disheartened at the rate of progress. I began considering what an ideal libre font editor ought to be, and how to make it happen. This presentation shows where FontForge is today, various efforts to develop new libre font editors, and where I hope to go in the next 10 years.

Dave Crossland attended the first LGM as an undergraduate graphic design student in London, and focused his studied and career on libre graphics ever since. After graduating from a Masters programme in Typeface Design he was lucky to be invited by Google to arrange financial support for new libre font projects, designed for the web, and today there are hundreds of such projects.

http://fontforge.github.io/

19:00

LGM2015 Party

This year, the standard LGM party takes a different angle. For one evening, we’re playing the archive from ten years of active collaboration in the Libre Graphics world. Comprised of software, its communities, and the practices and products that have arisen from those communities, the Libre Graphics community has been doing Free/Libre and Open Source work together for a decade. Join us to celebrate ten years of Libre Graphics, and to launch a new book, titled “I think that conversations are the best, biggest thing that free software has to offer its user” (or Conversations, for short), which looks back at the people behind ten years of Libre Graphics.

The event will take place Thursday, April 30th from 7pm to 10pm at interAccess which is located at 9 Ossington Avenue, roughly a 20 minute walk from the University or a convenient streetcar trip down Spadina and across Queen.g

http://libregraphicsmeeting.org/2015/celebrating-ten-years-of-lgm/

Friday 1 May 2015

10:00–
12:00

Loraine Furter

SPECIMEN SPRINT

At last LGM I did a lightning talk to present SPECIMEN, a blog and growing collection of graphic essays on F/LOS typefaces. This project was developed to rethink the traditional “neutral” form of font specimens, instead choosing a specific layout and content in line with the history and cultural implications of each typeface. An approach that takes in consideration the sources and the documentation of the fonts.

This year I would like to propose both a lecture (see lecture proposal) with examples of this approach to F/LOS typefaces and a “specimen workshop”.

The “specimen workshop”, or “specimen-sprint” is a two-hours workshop where the participants are invited to design specimens for F/LOS fonts, taking in consideration their (hi)story, and designed with F/LOS tools of their choice. By participating, they can help creating more visibility for F/LOS fonts with an approach playing on the strengths of the F/LOSS philosophy.
The participants will have access to references, source materials and information on the fonts, gathered by Loraine from the designers’ documentation and through e-mail interviews.
At the end of the workshop, the specimens will be printed and displayed at LGM’s venue and published online.

Loraine Furter is a graphic designer who recently met the Open Source approach, enriching her (graphical) practice and vision of creation. Loraine is active in the research around new forms of publishing, from digital and hybrid publishing to book sprints, and frequently gives workshops on this subject.

http://specimen.meteor.com/

ben sainsbury, Dr Andrew Hogue, Michael Gharbharan

Using Tangibles for pre-production

Traditionally, the pre-production pipeline starts with a script, and then the director develops concept art for each scene described in the script either on paper or in digital form. Following this stage, the director then works closely with an animator on a pre-visualization utilizing animation software (e.g. Autodesk Maya). The developed scene is visualized in a crude form using placeholder assets, but this crude visualization provides the director with information about the placement of actors/cameras/lights/objects enabling them to quickly try out new ideas, different lighting characteristics, and different cinematographic techniques. Once completed, a cinematographer is employed to determine the proper camera motions, placements, and provide critique on this initial design. The design process ensues with the director and cinematographer discussing necessary changes and through a series of compromises the scene is finalized and can be produced. This pipeline works for both animated and live-action pre-production, however due to the sheer number of people involved throughout the pre-production stage in defining the scene parameters, the director’s overall creative vision can easily be lost in the process.

Introduction to FilmTIME: a simple open source interface/tool for film directors to express creative vision.

http://www.filmtime.co/

Chris Murphy

Color: Putting it together

In this workshop attendees will learn how to implement a color managed workflow from capture to display to print. Emphasis will be on taking the basic concepts, to a basic workflow that should apply for anyone. It's expected GIMP, Scribus, and Krita features will be touched on as examples. Time permitting topics: CMYK workflow, Internet color, and mobile devices.

Chris Murphy is president of Color Remedies™ based in Denver. He specializes in worldwide training and consulting in emerging color technologies and has extensive experience in implementing color management workflows. He has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts in the City of New York, and is co-author of “Real World Color Management” published by Peachpit Press. Some say he has extra-sensory vision, but he continues to assure everyone that he does not.

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 10:00-14:20

12:00

Break

12:20

Gijs de Heij, Pierre Huyghebaert, Colm O'Neill, Ludivine Loiseau

Stroke-Fonts — open call for a standard?

Although we are convinced about the portential of stroke-fonts actually using them, while keeping their flexibility, is challenging. At the moment the best we can do to streamline the usage process is to freeze a version of the stroke at a set thickness, then outline it, building it back for use in current font formats. Especially on the web with it's dynamic potential this feels like a big loss. We look at the engineering that built DIN, Dr Hershey, Donald Knuth, Adobe Type 3 and SVG3 both with awe and equal frustration.

Could their be a way to integrate a stroke font format in to publishing software? A new definition of how lettershapes are described for them to be able to be used easily? Can we imagine a type-setting system that doesn't precompile glyphs shape, but renders them inline, so themselve glyphs can become responsive? We will take a look at the existing standards, but also the more experimental-tools, some of which OSP is working on, both for print and web-publication (and SVG3?).

OSP is a collective of graphic designers & programmers using only free and open source software. A caravan of practitioners from diverse fields, they design, program, research and teach. Working for print and web and its hybrids, OSP creates visual identities and digital utilities, always digging for a more intimate relation with the tool.

Gijs de Heij is a designer and programmer, part of OSP. And shares OSP's fascination for typography and it's (hidden) underlying formats & techniques.

http://osp.kitchen, de-heij.com

Larisa Blazic, Femke Snelting

A network of free culture aware educators in art, music and design education

Over the last few years we have seen a growing attention for Free Culture and Free, Libre and Open Source software within art education but these efforts remain often linked to the energy of individual teachers or even students. This network is an attempt to connect people, institutions, experiences and course-content.

A first meeting took place in Madrid in 2013. A second meeting took place on 5th April 2014 in Leipzig at the occasion of the Libre Graphics Meeting: http://libregraphicsmeeting.org

Educators, teachers and learners interested in the link between free culture and art, music and design education are welcome to join this network. We are part of Eightycolumn and use the http://lurk.org/groups/80c/ as a platform for discussion and communication.

This is a proposal (if Aymeric or Femke did not already submit it) to continue conversations benefiting the network.

Larisa Blazic, artist and lecturer, living in London, unionising data and organising post-graduate studies in FLOSS+art&design. Contributor to FLOSS Manuals, Libre Graphics and FLOSSIE communities and Software Sustainability Institute fellow. Founding member of Autonomous Tech Fetish (ATF) group, exploring how digital technology is fetishised and how we can respond – to defetishise it or refetishise into new forms, new configurations that serve our needs and desires.

http://eightycolumn.net/

Chris Murphy

Color: Now What?

Informal discussion on color management. Can run the gamut (pun intended) on color science, implementation case studies, success stories, best practices, work arounds for problems, present and future challenges. Share and learn with others.

Chris Murphy is president of Color Remedies™ based in Denver. He specializes in worldwide training and consulting in emerging color technologies and has extensive experience in implementing color management workflows. He has been an instructor at the School of Visual Arts in the City of New York, and is co-author of “Real World Color Management” published by Peachpit Press. Some say he has extra-sensory vision, but he continues to assure everyone that he does not.

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 10:00-14:20

14:20

Break

14:40

Lightning talks

Four 10 minute slots for lightning talks. Sign-up on location!

15:20

Phil Langley

Digital Steganography: A New File Type for 3D Models

Digital Steganography is the practice of concealing one file type within another, such as text within in image (it is also a long-standing method of encryption used by security agencies...). In this presentation I will describe a novel method for encoding 3D geometric data within an image file that create a new, cross platform file type for 3D models. The X,Y, Z values of a triangulated mesh, such as would typically be described by an STL file, can be mapped, more or less, directly to the R,G,B values of a pixel within a simple PNG file. Once mapped, the data can be organised within the image in may novel ways that create a 2D representation whose data is, at the same time, both human and machine readable. Using a number of prototype tools, developed using the processing programming language, I will demonstrate the following;
- Limitless opportunities for file encryption, using custom codes as well as image editing software.
- New ways of tracking 'the diff' between various 3D models files that are enabled by this new file format.
- Improvements in file compression when compared to other 3D file formats.

I am an architect and computational designer based in London and I am a PhD candidate at the Sheffield School of Architecture (SSoA) where my research is concerned with the agency of software and its social production within the field of architectural design. I am a visiting design tutor at SSoA where I co-organised the postgraduate design studio 'Open Data', with Mark Meagher. I am also a co-director of the design and research collective openkhana.net

https://github.com/phiLangley/openPHD

15:40

Brent Patterson

Using Open Source to Teach Critical and Creative Thinking

Over the past ten years I have been steadily increasing the amount of open source software I utilize in my design courses. I now believe I can teach digital media courses exclusively with free and open source software and not impair my students' chances of gainful employment. In fact, my students are better artists and designers directly because of their experience with open source tools. They are more versatile, easily adapt to change, and have a greater capacity to tinker with their tools. This presentation will be about the open source paradigm and its effect in the classroom. I will show how teaching with free and open source is a way to teach students the ability to learn software more efficiently and quickly, and inspire greater curiosity. Open source software not only makes students' portfolios more diverse and professional, it makes them better thinkers.

Presently, I am leading an initiative at my college, SUNY Buffalo State, to adopt more open source tools. I will discuss my experience in adopting this software in the classroom. I will also discuss the opposition and controversy from colleagues that I have encountered by using software that “is not industry standard”.

Brent Patterson has been teaching animation, interactive design, and visual effects at several colleges and universities since 2002. He has been a practicing artist and designer for twenty years. He has taught at Washington State University, West Virginia Wesleyan University, Marshall University and SUNY Buffalo State. His work has been exhibited at the Wexner Center for the Arts in Columbus, Ohio, the Jacob Lawrence Gallery in Seattle, Washington, as well as the Clay Center in Charleston, West Virginia. He currently lives and works in Buffalo, New York.

http://www.brentpatterson.com

16:00

Yvonne Micklich

Making- Become a Maker with open source software

The aim of my presentation is to talk about my inspiration of the maker scene and to showcase my project I developed in an open source environment. I created a dress with LEDs soldered onto the fabric building a special compound and a flexible circuit. The layout has been done with graphical open software like inkscape and gimp and is then printed with conductive ink to the fabric. I used Arduino software and microcontroller for making smart clothes to include LEDs and Accelerometer.

The created pattern work can be used either for fabric printing, laser cutting or even for sending to a hacked knitting machine to get an individual, customized style, fulfilling the aim that we can download and print clothes to start our own production. The creative culture and the use of free formats make it usable for further development. Tinkering in an open digital fabrication studio e.g. Fablab.
I plan to prepare a library of design content such as pattern printing, swatches pattern work, accessible under cc licensing.
To participate, exchange, explore, cooperate and show contribution, free access of knowledge is important. Therefore we share skills and knowledge in the community e.g. by launching The Fashion Tec Group where people come to present their projects.
Also different ideas have been presented at Meshcon and Wear it Conference and openXlab in Berlin.

I studied Product Development in Clothing and come from a classical fashion background. I worked for a clothing company. In 2009, I start to explore new Technology including LEDs in cloth, but it was not so easy to get a lot of information about it. During my research, especially the big Designers were at the forefront to market new Technology features. Although, there were only prototypes or couture pieces, they showed something new. Now, a lot of knowledge has been shared and during the codemotion in Berlin, I attended a workshop to learn about Arduino programming. Since then, I improved my skills in creative coding and eTextile. Also, I am part of the Fashion Tec Working group in Berlin to build a community of people to share their knowledge.

http://www.meetup.com/FashionTec-Meetup-Berlin/

16:20

Erwin Sacluti

Wilber for us!

I am a former public servant and my good friend is a public elementary educator, most of her students belong to the under privilege children in our community. Most of the time she asked me to do teaching materials for her daily lessons in Filipino Language, Elementary English, Music, Arts and Physical Education subjects. Helping her is just like helping the young students to achieved better education, aside from that we also created and published a free-coloring book for the under privilege pupil in the 16 Daycare centers in our town Pagsanjan. Then after, with the permission of her superior, we convinced him to train students to compete for the TECHNOLYMPICS were students will participate and compete for manipulating images using free image manipulation software from different public elementary school in our Province (District, Cluster and Division levels), for the first time that Unson Elementary School participated in the competition they rank 2nd among the 324 competing public elementary schools. With joy in our endeavor and permission from his superior we continue to teach all the 31 public educators in the elementary school to help them with their daily teaching duties and spread the knowledge of using libre graphics software.

I am Erwin Sacluti, 38 years of age, FIlipino, a former local youth leader, former public servant, computer graphics and programming enthusiast. I do share my free acquired knowledge at no cost for deserving young students and public educators in our community.

16:40

Liam Quin

Web Sites on a Stick: EPUB and the Web Converge

The organizations responsible for publishing EPUB and HTML as standards are working together on ways to make a mini-Web site that you can browse offline, on making an e-book be part of the Web, all using open standards and part of the Open Web Platform.

For the Libre world this means Web browsers and ebook readers move towards each other, so that the skills and tools you need become more closely aligned. It means documentation, tutorials, guides can be both on the Web and on a tablet or other reader.

But in the longer term it means another nail in the coffin of propritary hardware, proprietary apps, proprietary readers, because the ubiquity of the Web commoditizes everything.

It also means asking why there is a difference between an application and a document at all and what that question means for the Libre Graphics ecosystem.

Liam Quin is a member of the staff at the World Wide Web Consortium and has a background in digital typography and computer science. He also runs a stock image site, http://www.fromoldbooks.org/

Similar talks (but not directed at this community) are http://www.w3.org/Talks/2015/0214-digipub-xml-prague/ and http://w3c.github.io/epubweb/presentation/

17:00

Break

17:20

Tom Lechner

A Brief History of Lines

A look at the history of graphical linework, how different programs handle line creation and manipulation, and how these lines of thought extend into the future.

Tom is a cartoonist living in Portland, Oregon. He also makes Laidout, which he uses to produce his cartoon books.

http://www.tomlechner.com

17:40

Øyvind Kolås

Microraptor gui, an immediate compromise

Introducting Microraptor gui, a framework/approach for creating graphical user interfaces, that interleaves registering event callbacks with procedural drawing code backed by CSS. This gives some efficiency and flexibility not found in traditional scene-graph/widget hierarchy approaches; flexibility useful for custom canvases/controls in graphical applications. Demo and code heavy presentation, live coding of UIs with C, cairo and CSS.

Øyvind Kolås has experimented with writing digital media tools and UIs with for a couple of decades, some of his results have found use in different libre graphics libraries and applications. He is investigating new approaches to model, combine and interact with digital media.

http://pippin.gimp.org/

18:00

Markus Mohrhard

OpenGL in LibreOffice

LibreOffice uses its own GUI and rendering toolkit called VCL that works across every major PC platform and even a few mobile platforms. On Linux it provides backends for Gtk and Qt. To make use of modern graphics hardware the LibreOffice project decided to add a cross-platform backend that still provides support for different GUI toolkits.

Using OpenGL allows us to improve the performance of our rendering by moving the work from the CPU to the mostly unused GPU. It also provides us with fast image scaling allowing us to use better scaling algorithms while still supporting fast scrolling. Together with the fact that OpenGL allows us to innovate without being limited by the ancient rendering APIs provided by different systems, makes porting our rendering toolkit to OpenGL an attractive option.

Come and see how the LibreOffice embraced this challenge and implemented the new VCL OpenGL backend that is being shipped in LibreOffice 4.4.

Markus is studying Mathematics at the Karlsruhe Institue for Techonoology and works part time on LibreOffice for Collabora. He mainly concentrates on LibreOffice calc and charts and in recent times the OpenGL support. He also maintains the LibreOffice cppunit version and is a co-maintainer of mdds, ixion and orcus.

In his free time he likes to travel and see interesting new places.

18:20

Fridrich Strba, Valek Filippov

Document Liberation Project: One year after

The Document Liberation Project -- launched during the LGM2014 -- has already developed a dozen of import libraries which have been integrated by software such as: Abiword, Calligra, CorelDRAW File Viewer, Inkscape, LibreOffice and Scribus. The presentation gives overview of the achievement of the first year of this project

Fridrich Strba is double national of Switzerland and Slovakia, Free Software enthusiast and evangelist. A founding member of the Document Liberation Project, he worked in the code base of LibreOffice during years. His favourite activity is writing of import filters for various undocumented file-formats. Currently he works for SUSE at SUSE Linux Enterprise. Fridrich continues to dedicate his time to free proprietary documents from vendor lock in. Mr. Strba is also a polyglot.

19:00

LGM2016 organisation meeting

Next LGM will take place in London, UK. We are looking for volunteers to help out in preparing the program, infrastructure upkeep, funding, communication etc. You can also join this meeting via the #LGM channel @irc.freenode.net

Saturday 2 May 2015

10:00–
11:00

ginger coons

The first Code of Conduct year

Before the 2014 meeting in Leipzig, the LGM community realized the need for a code of conduct. Before, during, and after LGM 2014, a spirited and sometimes difficult discussion took place around the purpose of the CoC and how it should be drafted and implemented. This BoF aims to look at the code of conduct, as it's been implemented, and to discuss how we might improve it or strengthen its promises in the future.

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 10:00-13:20

11:00

Break

11:20

Antonio Roberts

Allowing Mistakes to Happen Workshop

Following on from the Allowing Mistakes to Happen presentation, I will facilitate a workshop that focuses on the practical side of creating glitch art. The workshop will delve into the techniques utilised by glitch artists, such as hacking codecs, modifying hardware and repurposing software.

The workshop participants will need a laptop/computer (Mac/Windows/Linux) with the following software installed: GIMP, Audacity & a good text editor such as Notepad++, TextEdit or Gedit.

Depending on time and interest from participants, additional software can be covered. If possible, please have installed: Processing, Pure Data, ffmpeg/libav, Imagemagick, Inkscape & Blender.

Antonio Roberts is a new-media artist and curator based in Birmingham, UK. Since 2007 he has curated exhibitions and projects including fizzPOP (2009 - 2010), GLI.TC/H Birmingham (2011), the Birmingham editions of Bring Your Own Beamer (2012, 2013) and Dirty New Media (2013).

As a performer and visual artist his work has been featured at galleries and festivals including Databit.me in Arles, France, Laptops Meet Musicians Festival in Venice, Italy, f(Glitch) at Stony Brook University, NY, glitChicago at the Ukrainian Institute of Modern art in Chicago, IL, Loud Tate: Code at Tate Britain, UK, and the Barber Institute of Fine Arts in Birmingham, UK.

He is artist in residence at the University of Birmingham where he is conducting research into copyright and the reuse and remixing of archive material.

http://www.hellocatfood.com

Nathan Willis

Bringing OpenType features to Open Source

OpenType features allow font files to build in a variety of optional functionality designed to make typography responsive and eye-pleasing: small-capitals, variant forms of glyphs (individually, like swash caps, or in stylistic sets), lining or tabular numeral options, extra ligatures, and even randomization. But software support for these features in creative and design applications is poor-to-nonexistent, in both the proprietary and free-software world.

The proprietary world has shown no interest in changing, but that should not stop free software. This meeting will examine OpenType feature support in libre graphics projects, looking at both the technical and user-experience problems that need to be solved, and what steps we must take to get there.

Nathan Willis is a free-software journalist and open font designer.

http://glyphography.com

Larisa Blazic

FLOSS Manuals - Libre Graphics update&expand

FLOSS Manuals project was launched by Adam Hyde in 2007 to remedy the deficit of good free documentation about Free Software. Our strategy since the beginning has been to develop communities to produce high quality free manuals about Free Software in their own language. Today, through the use of Booksprints and federated publishing techniques we have more than 120 books in more than 30 languages and more than 4,000 contributors.

FLOSS Manuals is more than a collection of manuals about doing things with free and open source software, it is also the community. The contributors include designers, readers, writers, illustrators, free software fans, editors, artists, software developers, activists, and many others. Anyone can contribute to a manual – to fix a spelling mistake, add a more detailed explanation, write a new chapter, or start a whole new manual on a topic.

FLOSS Manuals now consists of 3 independent language communities (French, English, Finnish) supported by a Foundation based in Holland. Our current focus is to develop strong partnerships with grassroots educators to develop educational materials about free software.

This is a proposal for gathering all interested participants to discuss strategies for updating and expanding current Libre Graphics sesction of FLOSS Manuals in English language.

Larisa Blazic, artist and lecturer, living in London, unionising data and organising post-graduate studies in FLOSS+art&design. Contributor to FLOSS Manuals, Libre Graphics and FLOSSIE communities and Software Sustainability Institute fellow. Founding member of Autonomous Tech Fetish (ATF) group, exploring how digital technology is fetishised and how we can respond – to defetishise it or refetishise into new forms, new configurations that serve our needs and desires.

http://www.e-w-n-s.net

On-going coding + ad-hoc meetings 10:00-13:20

13:20

Break

14:00

Diane Jung

How Hobbyists Impact Culture by Opening and Archiving

I would like to share my experience working at Creative Commons Korea. I witnessed some of the most enthusiastic volunteers in the world at their community, and many of their interesting creative works inspired me in many ways. Anyone want to hear about how this group of hobbyists gathered and impacted culture by opening their digitally archived works?

Diane is a Creative Commons activist, geek, writer, and embroidery lover. She has worked and volunteered with Creative Commons Korea, Code for Seoul, Open Government Partnership IRM, and other groups believing that the value of open matters. She is now a Torontonian, and looking for a job opportunity in the city.

http://cckorea.org

14:20

Jean-François Fortin Tam

Ten years of Pitivi (and of libre video editing in general)

“LGM 2015: Beyond The First Decade” has a special meaning for the Pitivi community, as this leading GStreamer-based video editor recently celebrated its own 10th anniversary.

In this talk, we will look at changes in the motion graphics landscape in recent years (shifts in filmmaking hardware and production pace,
computing power, means of distribution, etc.), take a moment to marvel at the progress we have made thus far (esp. from the Pitivi side), and another moment to ponder the herculean task that remains before us in order to remain relevant for the next decade.

This talk is intended to be less technical, touching on subjects such as heavy trends in the industry, FLOSS project management, economics, etc. All are welcome!

In addition to this presentation, interested parties may join us afterwards for an ad-hoc yet intensive testing session to weed out remaining bugs for the upcoming Pitivi 1.0 release.



Jean-François (“Jeff”) is a long-time interaction and UX designer. His experience and fields of interest include desktop software UI design, web and mobile, natural language and alternative input methods, branding, marketing, business strategy, cognitive and social psychology. With a deep passion for FLOSS, he has been an active Pitivi & GNOME contributor throughout the past decade.

Elected as the president of the GNOME Foundation in 2014, Jean-François is also the founder of the idéemarque branding & strategy company, located in Montréal, Canada.

http://jeff.ecchi.ca

14:40

Jehan Pagès, Han Aryeom

Project of a 2D Libre Movie: ZeMarmot

Studio Girin will present a 2D short animation project in progress (working title “ZeMarmot”), which is going to raise funds through crowdfunding.
The animation film will be produced entirely with Free Software, and will be ultimately released under a Libre license.
Synopsis summary:
« A Marmot lives a quiet life in Alps mountains. His main activities? Sleep, eat and sleep again. When a migrating bird tells him of the world's wonders, beyond the mountains, the rodents goes for an impromptu world tour. What will happen? Will the Marmot ever come back? »

Aryeom is a young South Korean independant animation film director and animation artists. Her first co-directed short animation, “Grandma Ocean” got screened in more than a dozen festivals and won 2 prices. She is now an artist in residency in the association LILA in Paris, and is trying to create her own animation studio, Studio Girin. Also she is an awesome user of GIMP.
Jehan has been an actor as a young kid for a dozen of years, especially for movie dubbings, and also won an “Outstanding Youth Actor in a Foreign Film” award. Nowadays he spends time as a software developer (among others for GIMP…), and he spent a few years traveling the world alone on a motorcycle (in particular from France to Japan), then he traveled with Aryeom. Their travels are inspirational of ZeMarmot's story.

http://girinstud.io

15:00

David Andrade, Szymon Buhajczuk

How to Build an Online Animation Studio

Theory Animation is an online animation studio born amongst the turmoil in the animation industry. From the closure to Rhythm & Hues and Dreamworks Animation; Theory looks at ways a studio can thrive in this changing world: Free Software (Blender, Joomla), Free Version-Control (Subversion), and a group of dedicated artists from around the world who want to make a difference. We'll talk history, present, and ultimately future: a place where artists can sell directly to consumers and do what they love.

Szymon Buhajczuk is a Engineering Manager with SimuTech Group and an Animator at Theory Animation. His passions include Blender, animating and aviation photography.
David Andrade is co-founder and animator at Theory Animation, the world's first online animation studio. He co-founded the company a day after Rhythm & Hues Studios laid him and his team off.

http://theoryanimation.com

15:20

Femke Snelting, Christoph Haag

'I think that conversations are the best, biggest thing that free software has to offer its user'

Launch of of publication + presentation of publishing workflow. 'Conversations' is an extensive collection of conversations between developers and designers involved in the wider ecosystem of Libre Graphics. Its lengthy title, _I think that conversations are the best, biggest thing that Free Software has to offer its user_, is taken from an interview with Debian developer Asheesh Laroia. His remark points at the difference that Free Software can make when users are invited to consider, interrogate and discuss not only the technical details of software, but its concepts and histories as well. 'Conversations' is edited by Femke Snelting and Christoph Haag. The publication is published by Constant and produced collaboratively, using a custom Libre Graphics workflow developed by Christoph Haag.

Christoph Haag studied design at the Department of Hybrid Space/Academy of Media Arts Cologne. Approaching graphic design from the commandline and the commandline from a design perspective, he is currently extending usage into programming. Lives and works in Augsburg, Germany.

Femke Snelting is an artist and designer, developing projects at the intersection of design, feminism and free software. She is a core member of the Brussels based association for arts and media, Constant and co-initiated the design/research team Open Source Publishing (OSP) and the Libre Graphics Research Unit. http://www.constantvzw.org

http://conversations.tools/

16:00

Larisa Blasic

LGM2016: London

Local organizer Larisa Blasic will present her plans and ideas for next year's LGM, taking place in London, UK.

16:20

Proposals for LGM2017 + Goodbye LGM2015

Before saying goodbye to LGM2015, candidates for LGM2017 will present and discuss their proposals that they submitted before the start of this year's edition. The final decision will be made by volunteers that have signed up to help out for LGM2016.